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Posts Tagged ‘Economic Fallacies’

“People with mortgages are still renters…”

April 11, 2010 Leave a comment

An incisive comment about people’s misunderstanding of what a mortgage represents: it is a promise to pay back a creditor a lump sum plus interest payments. In what real sense, then, is a mortgage holder an owner of a piece of property?

Via Felix Salmon’s Twitter feed.

Shocker: Real Estate Prices and Interest Rates are Inversely Related!

April 11, 2010 Leave a comment

One of the more annoying things about reading about residential real estate is this repeated claim by those who should know better that real estate is an inflation hedge.

But, if you stop and think about it for a moment, you will quickly realize that’s a foolish argument. Residential real estate is principally financed by debt; therefore, its price should move inversely to inflation, just as do other debt securities such as bonds.

In any event, it’s very refreshing to see the New York Times accurately reporting on the relationship between real estate prices and interest rates:

The impact of higher rates is likely to be felt first in the housing market, which has only recently begun to rebound from a deep slump. The rate for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage has risen half a point since December, hitting 5.31 last week, the highest level since last summer.

Along with the sell-off in bonds, the Federal Reserve has halted its emergency $1.25 trillion program to buy mortgage debt, placing even more upward pressure on rates.

“Mortgage rates are unlikely to go lower than they are now, and if they go higher, we’re likely to see a reversal of the gains in the housing market,” said Christopher J. Mayer, a professor of finance and economics at Columbia Business School. “It’s a really big risk.”

Each increase of 1 percentage point in rates adds as much as 19 percent to the total cost of a home, according to Mr. Mayer.

The Mortgage Bankers Association expects the rise to continue, with the 30-year mortgage rate going to 5.5 percent by late summer and as high as 6 percent by the end of the year.

I would say that I hope this augurs financial literacy on the part of buyers of residential real estate, but even I am not that optimistic.

Offshoring Jobs and the Myth of a Static Economy

April 6, 2010 1 comment

It has become a commonplace that American jobs have been eliminated in favor of cheaper labor overseas. To some extent, this is true, but it misses the real story. Most of the jobs that have moved overseas, and which are not coming back to the United States, are jobs for which educational requirements are minimal. The poorly trained and uneducated are the victims of structural changes in America’s economy.

(Other victims of structural changes in the American economy are the overeducated who pursue education in fields for which there is very little demand, such as humanities PhDs. But there is little sympathy for naive academics who find themselves unemployable.)

But, there’s nothing new about this. When elevators went from manual to automated, the people who lost out were elevator operators, who, of course, did not need much in the way of education to do their jobs. Likewise, when sock or textile manufacturers move their operations from, say, the Midwest, to China, it is the employees of American textile mills, who, by and large are relatively uneducated, who lose. Other Americans gain.

Now, to a very large extent, this is blaming the victim for economic forces beyond his control. That is true. However, it is also true that if the American economy wants to continue to grow over the coming decades, there will be winners and losers in it. Egalitarianism is a false ideal upon which Stalin murdered tens of millions of people. That is what social safety nets are supposed to account for (in part). It is also incumbent upon people to realize the precariousness of their current employment and pursue opportunities to develop skills that are transferable. The United States’ deplorable educational system does not help in this regard.

But we can’t conclude from any of this, as some do, that the overall number of jobs in the United States has decreased because a lot of those jobs have been moved overseas. Neither the economy nor the number of jobs is a static thing. Buggy whip manufacturers were driven out of business by the development of the internal combustion engine, but in the decades since the internal combustion engine was invented, many more jobs than were ever lost by buggy whip manufacturers have been created.